Baking Steel Pizza: Tomato & Mozzarella // Caramelized Onion & Burrata

cutpizza2

In September 2008 I returned from Slow Food Nation convinced I would, by the end of the week, build a mud oven in the alleyway next to my apartment and, as a result, have wood-fired pizzas at my disposal from then on out.

I had watched volunteers at SFN stomp in the mud and cobble together an oven in two days, and I couldn’t stop dreaming about the pizzas, thin and crisp with a blistered bubbly edge, that emerged from that wood-fired oven.

After doing a little research, I made a list of supplies and stuck it to my fridge. I even bought a book: How to Build Your Own Hearth Oven. It was going to happen. I would get my wood-fired oven.

But a few weeks passed, and I never got around to building it. And before I knew it, a few years passed. And then a few children appeared. And then a few dreams disappeared.

Friends, guess what? It’s never going to happen. I am nev-er going to build that mud oven nor am I going to drop ten grand on a more professional wood-fired oven.

But guess what? It’s OK, because there is a product that will make all desires for acquiring these high-speed tools disappear. I had read about the Baking Steel in the Wall Street Journal and then in Food and Wine, but it was this post on Serious Eats that convinced me I had to buy one immediately.

The story of the Baking Steel begins with Andris Lagsdin, a passionate cook, who, after reading about the conductive properties of steel in Nathan Myhyrvold’s Modernist Cuisine, began baking pizzas at home on steel plates made at his family-run steel company, Stoughton Steel. Pleased to discover that what he had read proved true — that because “steel is a more conductive cooking surface than stone,” pizza “cooks faster and more evenly at a lower temperature, resulting in a beautiful, thin, crispy crust” — Lagsdin initiated a Kickstarter campaign. And so was born the Baking Steel. Serious Eats’ Kenji Lopez-Alt, describes the tool as “the most impressive home pizza product [he's] ever tested.”

About a year ago I discovered tipo 00 flour, which, when used in the Lahey pizza dough recipe, produced the best pizzas I had ever made. Learning to shape the rounds with a delicate hand, moreover, created great bubbles throughout the pie as well as that ballooned and blistered outer edge characteristic of Neopolitan pizzas. The Baking Steel takes these bubbles to another level. Kenji offers this explanation:

    “How does the baking surface affect hole structure? Well those crust holes develop when air and water vapor trapped inside the dough matrix suddenly expand upon heating in a phenomenon known as oven spring. The faster you can transfer energy to the dough, the bigger those glorious bubbles will be, and the airier and more delicate the crust.”

For the past month, I have been making some sort of pizza or flatbread nearly every day, and they have never tasted so good. A few pictures below capture the “oven spring” as well as the crispy, speckled “undercarriage,” the two traits that separate Baking Steel pizzas from the sheetpan pizzas I have been making for years.

There are other virtues to the steel as well — it’s lighter and more durable than stone; it doesn’t require a supply of wood — and again, you can read a thorough and more scientific analysis of the steel on Serious Eats. Below are recipes for two of my favorite pizzas: margherita made with a barely cooked tomato sauce; and caramelized onion and burrata.

So, am I telling you that the next $79 you spend should be on a Baking Steel? Yes, I am. But this is the way I see it: with the Baking Steel now a permanent fixture in my oven, I have no use for any backyard wood-fired apparatus, which means I basically just earned $10,000, which will pay for what, a week (maybe two?) of one child’s college tuition? I know, I know, you can thank me later. Go on, order that steel and while you’re at it, crack open a few bottles of champagne. There’s never been more reason to celebrate.

Oven spring:
oven spring

barely cooked tomato sauce

Making the sauce:
making the sauce

Margherita toppings

Lahey pizza dough:
Lahey pizza dough

I noted last week in the za’atar flatbread recipe that using parchment paper on a pizza peel is kind of wimpy. A nicely floured or cornmeal-sprinkled peel should allow a pizza to slide gracefully onto that heated surface, right? Well, in my experience, this doesn’t always happen. And pies that stick to peels can make a mess both on the steel or stone and on the floor of your oven. Moreover, flour or cornmeal that is left on a steel or a stone burns, which might fill your kitchen with smoke and cause your fire alarm to sound. And think about it: at the best pizza restaurants with those magnificent wood-fired ovens, the pizza maker is equipped with both a peel and a broom, which he/she uses to sweep away any flour, toppings, etc. left in the main cooking area. Home cooks can’t really do this. Parchment paper has solved this issue for me. The pizza-topped parchment paper slides effortlessly onto the heated stone. The presence of the paper does not affect how the pizza is cooked, and the paper can be removed (if desired) after a minute or two.
stretched dough

sauced dough

sauced and cheesed dough

just-baked Margherita pizza

just-baked Margherita pizza

just-baked Margherita pizza

cut Margherita pizza

Margherita Pizza on the Baking Steel

Pizza Dough Source: Bon Appetit via Jim Lahey’s book: My Pizza.

Note: If you buy Tipo 00 flour, this recipe comes together in seconds — each bag conveniently weighs 1000g, which is what the recipe calls for.

Also, for those of you unfamiliar with the Lahey pizza dough, you need to plan ahead: the dough sits at room temperature for 18 hours before it can be used. Moreover, after the 18 hours, it benefits from some cold fermentation in the fridge. The 6 rounds of dough can be used over the course of three days.

For this pizza you’ll need:

tomato sauce (recipe below)
fresh mozzarella (buffalo if you can find it) or burrata, sliced or roughly torn
fresh basil

equipment: Baking Steel, pizza peel, parchment paper (optional)

Lahey Dough:
7 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (1000 grams) plus more for shaping dough
4 teaspoons fine sea salt
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast

1. Whisk flour, salt, and yeast in a medium bowl. While stirring with a wooden spoon, gradually add 3 cups water; stir until well incorporated. Mix dough gently with your hands to bring it together and form into a rough ball. Transfer to a large clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let dough rise at room temperature (about 72°) in a draft-free area until surface is covered with tiny bubbles and dough has more than doubled in size, about 18 hours (time will vary depending on the temperature in the room).

2. Transfer dough to a floured work surface. Gently shape into a rough rectangle. Divide into 6 equal portions. Working with 1 portion at a time, gather 4 corners to center to create 4 folds. Turn seam side down and mold gently into a ball. Dust dough with flour; set aside on work surface or a floured baking sheet. Repeat with remaining portions.

3. Let dough rest, covered with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel, until soft and pliable, about 1 hour. Wrap each dough ball separately in plastic wrap and chill.

4. If you have a Baking Steel or pizza stone, place it in the oven and preheat your oven to 550ºF. Alternatively, just preheat your oven to high and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Allow steel or stone to heat for 45 minutes.

5. About 20 minutes before baking, remove pizza dough from fridge and let rest on a lightly floured surface.

6. When ready to bake, place a piece of parchment paper on a pizza peel. Alternatively, sprinkle peel with cornmeal or flour. (Note: I know using parchment paper is kind of wimpy, but it prevents any kind of sticking to the peel and it allows you to not have to use any flour or cornmeal, which burn on pizza stones and steels after the pizza is removed from the oven.) With lightly floured hands, stretch dough out into an 11-inch circle — do this in the air or on your lightly floured work surface (however you feel comfortable) being sure to handle the dough as delicately as possible. This video might offer some guidance. Transfer round to peel (or sheet pan if you are not using a steel or stone). Spoon sauce in a light layer over the dough’s surface. Top with a light layer of mozzarella cheese.

7. If you are using a peel, shimmy the whole piece of pizza-topped parchment paper onto preheated steel or stone. Alternatively, place pan in oven. (Note: After about a minute or two, you can pull the piece of parchment paper from underneath the pizza (if you wish) or you can just let it char.) Cook for about 5 to 6 minutes if using peel or stone — it might take more or less time depending on your oven and on the size of the pizza you made, but start checking after 5 minutes. On a sheetpan, the pizza will probably take more like 7 to 10 minutes.

8. Remove pizza from oven using your peel — a pair of tongs might help, too. Transfer pizza to cutting board. Throw basil over top. Cut and serve.

Barely Cooked Tomato Sauce

Notes: This is just a modified version of the widely adored Marcella Hazan tomato sauce. The differences here are that the onion is sautéed until soft, there is the addition of garlic, and the sauce just takes less time to throw together — once the tomatoes hit the pan, they simmer for five to 10 minutes and the sauce is done.

I have been making this sauce to serve with pasta. Just add a handful of freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano, lots of chopped fresh basil and freshly ground black pepper. So fresh and delicious.

3 to 4 beef steak tomatoes
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 to 1 onion (depending on the size), diced to yield about 1/2 cup
Kosher salt to taste
2 cloves garlic, minced

1. Cut a small “x” in the back of each tomato. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Drop tomatoes into water and cook for about a minute. Remove tomatoes and plunge them into a bowl of cold water. When they are cool enough to handle, peel the skin and discard it. Chop the flesh into fine dice.

2. Meanwhile, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and season it with a pinch of kosher salt. Sauté (or sweat — you don’t need the onion to brown or caramelize) the onion until it is soft and translucent, about five minutes. Add the minced garlic and the diced tomatoes. Season with more kosher salt. Simmer for another 5 to 10 minutes until the sauce is just slightly reduced.

Caramelized onion & burrata pizza:
caramelized onion & burrata pizza

Oven spring:
oven spring

caramelized onion & burrata pizza

Undercarriage:
under carriage

Caramelized Onion & Burrata Pizza
Pizza Dough Source: Bon Appetit via Jim Lahey’s book: My Pizza.

For this pizza you’ll need:

caramelized onions
burrata
basil (optional)

equipment: Baking Steel, pizza peel, parchment paper (optional)

Lahey Dough:
7 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (1000 grams) plus more for shaping dough
4 teaspoons fine sea salt
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast

1. Whisk flour, salt, and yeast in a medium bowl. While stirring with a wooden spoon, gradually add 3 cups water; stir until well incorporated. Mix dough gently with your hands to bring it together and form into a rough ball. Transfer to a large clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let dough rise at room temperature (about 72°) in a draft-free area until surface is covered with tiny bubbles and dough has more than doubled in size, about 18 hours (time will vary depending on the temperature in the room).

2. Transfer dough to a floured work surface. Gently shape into a rough rectangle. Divide into 6 equal portions. Working with 1 portion at a time, gather 4 corners to center to create 4 folds. Turn seam side down and mold gently into a ball. Dust dough with flour; set aside on work surface or a floured baking sheet. Repeat with remaining portions.

3. Let dough rest, covered with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel, until soft and pliable, about 1 hour. Wrap each dough ball separately in plastic wrap and chill.

4. If you have a Baking Steel or pizza stone, place it in the oven and preheat your oven to 550ºF. Alternatively, just preheat your oven to high and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Allow steel or stone to heat for 45 minutes.

5. About 20 minutes before baking, remove pizza dough from fridge and let rest on a lightly floured surface.

6. When ready to bake, place a piece of parchment paper on a pizza peel. Alternatively, sprinkle peel with cornmeal or flour. (Note: I know using parchment paper is kind of wimpy, but it prevents any kind of sticking to the peel and it allows you to not have to use any flour or cornmeal, which burn on pizza stones and steels after the pizza is removed from the oven.) With lightly floured hands, stretch dough out into an 11-inch circle — do this in the air or on your lightly floured work surface (however you feel comfortable) being sure to handle the dough as delicately as possible. This video might offer some guidance. Transfer round to peel (or sheet pan if you are not using a steel or stone). Scatter caramelized onions in a light layer over the dough’s surface. Top with a light layer of sliced/spread burrata cheese.

7. If you are using a peel, shimmy the whole piece of pizza-topped parchment paper onto preheated steel or stone. Alternatively, place pan in oven. (Note: After about a minute or two, you can pull the piece of parchment paper from underneath the pizza (if you wish) or you can just let it char.) Cook for about 5 to 6 minutes if using peel or stone — it might take more or less time depending on your oven and on the size of the pizza you made, but start checking after 5 minutes. On a sheetpan, the pizza will probably take more like 7 to 10 minutes.

8. Remove pizza from oven using your peel — a pair of tongs might help, too. Transfer pizza to cutting board. Throw basil over top. Cut and serve.

caramelized onion & burrata

62 Comments

  1. I love my baking steel. It is my prized possession. It sounds silly, but it is almost life changing! I was a kickstarter backer of the product and I’m so glad, because it is just awesome.

    Reply
  2. The pizzas look fabu – I’ll have to look into a steel, but think I will try this dough recipe just on my stone first to see how it goes.

    Regarding the Lahey Dough, some questions:

    let’s see if I have this straight – mix dough together, let it rise 18 hours, then form into smaller balls and let it sit in fridge for an hour, then use.

    Hmmm so if I start at say 8pm, then the dough is ready at 2pm the next day. If I want to do this for dinner, I’d have to start at maybe 10pm the day before? Seems … I dunno … kinda fussy?

    Can the smaller balls at least be frozen and used another time? How sensitive to sitting longer during the 18 hour rise is the dough – if I don’t get back from biking for an hour or two later than planned, is the dough still going “to work”?

    Love your posts, love your pics, almost always love your recipes! :-D

    Reply
    • Peter, hi! So great to hear from you. Ok, so, yes, the dough in terms of planning ahead is fussy! Yes, after the 18 hours, the dough is divided into six balls and then the balls sit at room temperature (I might need to fix this in the recipe) for an hour before being wrapped and then chilled. After this hour, the pizzas can be used immediately, but you get better oven spring if the dough is chilled for a few hours. I do always mix this dough at night right before bed. Then I portion it in the middle of the day ( I am home with the kids, which makes this easy and which I know is not possible for many people), chill it, and then use two or three rounds that evening. Unfortunately, the Lahey dough does not freeze well. I’ve tried several times, and it just never produces pizzas that are as good as when the dough is fresh. Now, in terms of the 18-hour window, there is definitely flexibility. If you let it go 20 hours, it will be fine. Similarly, on really warm days, I find that by 12 to 16 hours, the dough has risen to the top of the bowl and is ready to be divided and shaped. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  3. I think being raised in Connecticut inspires the need to make amazing homemade pizza. I was never a big fan of the results with pizza stones but I think this post sold me on the pizza steel…even though the thought of a piping hot piece of steel in my oven frightens me a little.

    Reply
    • Hallo for Holland! Will that ever get old? Corrine, I think you are right. I have been obsessed with white clam pizzas since I was 10 years old. Don’t be afraid of the steel — it is awesome!

      Reply
  4. I am so excited!! Because I, too, have had a list of supplies and directions for a wood burning oven sitting around for years, and I trust your advice, I ordered the baking steel before I even finished reading the rest of your post!!! Since a trip to Italy eight years ago, I have been trying to recreate the pizzas of my memories. Thanks so much for sharing this information and helping me get closer to reaching my goal–pizza perfection! Yum!

    Reply
    • So exciting, Trish! Do you already have a peel? I had one from years ago. It was fun pulling it out again and took a little practice getting used to again: the first time I used it, I assembled a second pizza on the peel, and so, when I went to remove the first pizza from the oven, I didn’t have anything to pull it out with! Rookie move. I could have just used tongs, but I panicked and ended up burning the first pizza … alas,mi learned my lesson. I hope you enjoy your Steel!

      Reply
      • Yes, I do have a peel and I love it. How funny about Pizzeria Mozza! My husband, daughter and I went to LA a couple of weeks ago and we literally drove from the airport straight to Pizzeria Mozza just in time to make our reservations. So good! FYI, I ordered the steel yesterday and it is already being shipped today!

        Reply
  5. I recently found a great resource to learn better techiniques for making and shaping pizza dough. It’s at http://www.craftsy.com/class/perfect-pizza-at-home/186#. Peter Reinhart does a great job of demonstrating delicious doughs as well as sauces. We do have a wood fired pizza oven in our back yard that my husband built from plans found on the internet. We love our wood fired pizzas and it didn’t cost anywhere near $10,000! I make pizza dough all the time using Reinhart’s neo-neopolitan recipe. I do use the pizza stone in my kitchn oven when we don’t want to fire up the wood oven. I like my stone, but will be looking into this steel as well~ thanks for the post!

    Reply
    • Becky — thanks so much for passing along this resource. I think I need to enroll immediately. And would love to hear more about your wood-fired pizza oven. And I am relieved to hear it can be built for under $10,000…maybe I was being a little dramatic? For awhile I subscribed to the Forno Bravo newsletter, and I got depressed every time I browsed at their selection of ovens. I am going to check out Reinhart’s dough recipe — I love his stuff. I really do want to hear more about your wood-fired oven — how much wood do you go through (roughly) to heat it up, and to keep it going for a night of pizza cooking? I love the idea of it.

      Reply
  6. Hi Alexandra,
    Thank you for sharing your experience with your readers. Your photos are stunning. You make it look easy! I am just loving the oven spring you are getting with your dough recipe! So happy the Baking Steel has made it into your hands.
    Beautiful stuff!
    Andris

    Reply
  7. Fantastic article/photos and looks like an excellent recommendation! Thank you Alexandra. One question, did you consider the other “sizes” of the baking steel on offer? Is the 22lb or 30lb overkill for a home cook?

    Reply
    • Jake — I wish I could lend you mind so you could see for yourself. I am perhaps not the best judge — haven’t lifted a weight since college — but I am amazed by how heavy 15 pounds feels. It is definitely less cumbersome than a stone for whatever reason, but even so, 15-lbs is not light. That said, if you don’t mind lifting heavy gadgets, I don’t see any harm in experimenting with a heavier plate. Honestly, I think you should email Andris: andris@stoughtonsteel.com or contact him on Facebook. He is so receptive to these kinds of questions and might have some better insight. Let me know if you would like me to contact him for you. I would be happy to do so.

      Reply
  8. Your posting is an answer to my “pizza prayers!” I have tried and tried to make a pizza that looks like your photos; each attempt, a failure. Cannot wait to invest in the pizza steel and will use the Lahey recipe. Thanks so much for all your wonderful info!

    Reply
  9. Having previously owned and used a wood-burning oven, I am skeptical that a pizza steel and an indoor oven could actually produce spots of char. The only thing I’ve seen produce that is a wood flame.

    I could see how direct contact of the steel could maybe create spots of char, but how did that happen on the top of the pizza???

    Reply
    • Hi Mark — I’m not sure the steel is actually responsible for the spots of char on top of the pizza. Even without the steel, I was able to get a bit of that blistering on the outer edge of the crust. You can see that charring on the edge of the pizza in this post: http://www.alexandracooks.com/2012/05/31/tipo-00-flour-worth-paying-for-shipping/ which was made on a sheetpan. I think the charring happens on these pizzas mostly because the Lahey dough by nature has so many air pockets in it, and the layers of dough surrounding the air pockets are thin, which make them more susceptible to charring. Does that make sense? I did try the Baking Steel-broiler method as outlined in Kenji’s post here: http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2012/09/the-pizza-lab-the-baking-steel-delivers.html, which created even more charring, but for simplicity, I prefer not doing that method.

      And oh my gosh, just looked at your last blog post. Will be diving into the archives. How did you say goodbye to that oven?!! That pizza is perfection.

      Reply
      • That makes sense about enough heat and the airy dough…. equals some charring.

        Yes, I had to leave the pizza behind. My wife got transferred to San Antonio and our beloved oven had a five foot deep foundation.

        We built the oven after moving away from Phoenix. We missed the famed Pizzeria Bianco so much and the wood-oven pizza craze had not yet hit Dallas/Fort Worth. San Antonio has a pretty amazing pizzeria, “Dough,” so we are now happy customers there. But, I miss making pizza.

        Reply
        • When we moved across country from CA to VA, my husband drove (I flew with the toddler) and stopped in Phoenix just so he could go to Pizzeria Bianco, which I had read about in Bon Appetit and other places. He said it was amazing. I was so jealous. We had a favorite spot in Los Angeles — Pizzeria Mozza — and our favorite spot here (DC) is — 2Amys. We’re about to move up to Albany area. It won’t feel like home till I find my “Dough.” Hope you get to start making pizza again soon!

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  10. So intriguing! I bought a cast iron pizza… thing last year. Much better than our two stones that both split and died in the oven. Would love to do a side by side comparison with the steel.

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  11. Ohh – incredible pictures of these wonderful pizza’s – I’m inspired and ready to go!! SO glad to have found your blog and excited to follow :))
    Mary x

    Reply
  12. What a fabulous post, and what a terrific site. This is my first visit. I am intrigued by the steel. I have a large round Matfer steel pan I have used for years. I use it on my gas grill outside, and I get wonderful crust. It is not as thick as the steel you have used, however. Thanks for the info and introduction.

    And I think Jim Lahey is a genius. Enough said! Thanks for the terrific read.

    Reply
    • Welcome! Thank you so much for your nice comment. I am intrigued by the Matfer steel pan — never heard of the brand. Must do some research. I am curious as to how the steel will perform on the grill…i think that could be really fun. Thanks for writing in!

      Reply
  13. This reminds me of when I first found out about baking steel. I immediately tried to place an order online but it would cost over 150USD to buy and ship it to London. And then I remembered we were going to NYC. So as part of our luggage back from NYC was 7kgs of pizza steel.

    I haven’t bought a pizza peel yet but I find if you make the pizzas small and long you can pick up the paper and place it onto the pizza steel ok. When they are done I use drag the paper onto a spatula and hold the paper on the other end and quickly put it on a plate.

    Your pizzas looks so professional compared to mines! I am going to try your Margarita recipe when I get back to Australia.

    Reply
    • ExplodyFull — hieee! Nice work on getting around not having to buy a peel. I love that you put the steel in your luggage…did they charge you extra? Definitely try the Margherita pizza — it’s so simple but so delicious. Do you use the Lahey dough?

      Reply
  14. No charge extra charge for the pizza steel but they did open it all up and check it when we left US customs. I guess it doesn’t scan good! I have been using your 5 min a day pizza dough from ages ago. Haven’t tried the Lahey dough yet but when I get back to Australia…

    Reply
  15. I have been using Caputo tipo 00 for some time now, and it is an improvement. I order from The Pennsylvania Macaroni company located in Pittsburgh, or friends bring me a 5lb bag when the go home to visit. Penna Mac has 10 2.2 bags for $31.95 + shipping. Here’s the link for future reference.

    http://www.pennmac.com/items/3411//

    I enjoy your blog and the pizza Margherita is on my to try list , while the steel pan is on my kitchen toy list.

    Vicky

    Reply
  16. Hi. I just found you yesterday. I already have my flour (My Whole Foods carries it) and I ordered my steel about an hour ago.
    Do you think that the recipe for the dough may be cut in half? I live alone and six pizzas in two-three days is a little too many?
    Thank you and your blog is just great!

    Reply
    • Judy, so exciting! Yes, I definitely think it can be cut in half. I haven’t done it, but I have no doubt especially since it rises slowly over the course of 16 to 18 hours. I have been meaning to do this too — the full recipe is kind of a lot for me sometimes.

      Good luck with the Lahey dough and the steel! I am loving mine. If I could offer any bit of advice re the Lahey dough it’s to use a very light hand when shaping the dough. I note this in the Lahey dough post but also in this one — you want to see those air pockets in the dough when you stretch it across the peel (or parchment-lined peel). Let me know if you have any questions!

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      • Pizza update. I made pizza last night using dough that I had frozen in a vacuum sealed bag. The dough had been in my freezer for about two months. It was delicious and I think that the crust was almost as good as when it is freshly made.

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  17. Well, I had my first Lahey-Baking Steel pizza last night. I cut the recipe for the dough in half and I think that it worked just fine. I have nothing to compare this with except the crust was far superior to the version that I have previously used over the past years. I topped my dough with honey and garlic roasted cherry tomatoes, goat cheese, sun dried tomatoes, and a tiny bit of mozzarella cheese. Tonight it will be caramelized onions, gorgonzola and Red Bell Pepper & Ancho Chili Jam. I was unable to find fig jam but this should be good, also.
    Thanks for your wonderful blog and for enlightening all of us on the “right way to make pizza.” I am tossing my pizza stone out the window!

    Reply
    • So happy to hear this! The combinations of your pizza toppings are making me salivate. Can you elaborate on your honey and garlic roasted cherry tomatoes? They sound heavenly. And I love the idea of pairing them with goat cheese…divine. The pepper-ancho jam sounds wonderful as well — sometimes fig jam is hard to find. My mom usually finds it at Marshall’s. Anyway, I am so happy to hear you are liking your baking steel! I haven’t used mine in my new house/oven yet, but I hope to soon. Will obviously keep you posted :)

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      • The Maple Syrup Roasted Tomatoes recipe came from Saveur Magazine’s website. You should be able to find it. After I roast them, I freeze them individually. They come in handy in the dead of winter. I use them for salads and pasta and pizzas. They are yummy.

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          • Day three, last of the pizza dough. It ended up with toppings of pineapple, Canadian Bacon, Cheese, Bacon Bits, and finally scallions, after the pie came out of the oven. Overall, i think that this has been a really great experience. This weekend, maybe some baby back ribs on the Big Green Egg, and next week, the steel moves to the Egg for my Lahey-Steel-Alexandra test! Have a nice weekend.
            I can keep you posted if you like. Thanks for all of your great input!

          • Oh my gosh, this all sounds so amazing, from the latest pizza toppings to the Big Green Egg-Steel-combo experiment…please keep me posted! One of my dear friend’s parents have a Big Green Egg and swear by it. Do you love yours? Also, I am in the process of making the maple roasted cherry tomatoes. I used bigger tomatoes (about the size of plum tomatoes but in the shape of a circle) so I am cooking them longer — they’ve been in the oven for six hours now. The house has smelled amazing all day long. Can’t wait to try these tomatoes!

  18. Alexandra! I sure wish I had read this BEFORE I sunk thousands of dollars into a brick oven in our back yard. It does not circulate the heat well, dough gets either burned or not cooked enough. What a pain in the neck! We are mad about pizza! I’m going to try this method this weekend. Maybe I could put the steel inside the brick oven? Thanks for the beautiful pictures and great tips!

    Reply
    • Oh no! You should get a refund! or they should come and make improvements or something! I’m sorry to hear this. I am mad about pizza, too, and I am sure the Steel would work well inside the brick oven. I have been using the Steel at least once a week. Wish your pizza oven would work out for you.

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    • Update. Well, I finally got someone to take my steel outside to my Big Green Egg and it did not fit!!! So, we baked three pizzas on a stone on my Big Green Egg. i was able to maintain the temperature at about 650 degrees. I used the Lahey recipe for the dough. All three pizzas were really, really good but I think that they would have been a tad better with the steel. I emailed Andris Lagsdin at Stoughton Steel and got a very quick reply. They can make a round steel. I gave her a dimension and asked for a quote.

      Reply
      • Oh no! Andris will come to the rescue! Glad you were able to get a quick response, and I hope the circular Steel ends up in your hands soon — can’t wait to hear how it works with the Big Green Egg. Am I going to have to purchase one of those? ALso, I don’t know if I ever reported back on the maple-roasted tomatoes, but they were absolutely divine. I brought them to a friend’s house I was staying with for a few days, and we gobbled them up and added a few to this baked feta recipe: http://www.alexandracooks.com/2012/08/29/a-sprouted-kitchen-feast/ Heaven! Thank you. Great to hear from you again.

        Reply

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