Tipo 00 Flour — Worth Paying For Shipping

fig jam, caramelized onion and blue cheese pizza

A series of fortuitous events in the past few months have led to a number of wonderful discoveries: an ingredient — Tipo 00 flour; a technique — minimal handling of dough; and a reward — the best pizza I have ever made at home.

Let’s start from the beginning. Five trips in three weeks to 2Amys Pizzeria in NW Washington DC (over an hour drive from my house) convinced me it was finally time to get my hands on some Tipo 00 flour, a soft-grain flour requisite in the production of D.O.C. Neapolitan pizza, an ingredient I’ve been thinking about for five years now.

I hate to admit it and in retrospect it pains me, but a $7.25 shipping charge has been the sole barrier between me and Tipo 00 flour for about a year now. Am I wrong to expect everything to ship for free and arrive the next day? (I know, so bratty! Sorry.) Anyway, to soften the blow, I ordered 10 bags, which made the total price per bag $4.22, a nominal fee especially when each bag yields six pizzas.

About the time that my flour arrived, I received a text message from a friend who had been experimenting with the Jim Lahey pizza dough. The message read: “Help!” While she had been having great success flavor-wise with the Lahey recipe, her pies were less than picturesque. (Click on the link…it will make you chuckle. I love you, Bates.)

I had to come to my friend’s rescue. She had requested video guidance, which I was certain was out there and which I was determined to find for her. My quest for her, however, may have proven to help me equally as well. A video and a note published on Serious Eats made me realize that for all these years that I have been making homemade pizza, I have been majorly overhandling my dough, at least for the sort of pizza I strive to make.

The note from Lahey read as follows:

    While I’m not picky about the flour — either bread flour or all-purpose is fine — what does concern me is how the dough is handled. Treat it gently so the dough holds its character, its texture. When you get around to shaping the disk for a pie, go easy as you stretch it to allow it to retain a bit of bumpiness (I think of it as blistering), so not all of the gas is smashed out of the fermented dough.

Having just spent $42 on 10 bags of flour, I sort of wished Lahey felt more strongly about the type of flour he used, but ultimately I agree that the handling of the dough is more important than the type of flour used. As soon as I began really paying attention to how I shaped my pizza rounds — gently/minimally — I noticed a difference in the finished product. The air pockets pervading the unbaked round (video/photo below) really affect the flavor and texture of the baked pizza.

I’ve made the Lahey dough many times now, and it is always delicious, regardless if I use bread flour or Tipo 00 flour. I do feel strongly, however, that the Tipo 00 flour produces a superior product, especially in texture. The unbaked dough is softer, more delicate and easier to shape — it doesn’t resist the shaping as much as the dough made with bread flour. The crust of the baked pizza, too, is a bit more tender, and the outer edge has a bit more chew.

Again, regardless of the flour, with the Lahey method, I’ve finally been able to achieve that quintessensial Neopolitan ballooned and blistered outer edge. I think I’m ready for my wood-burning oven. Santa, I hope you’re reading.

Finally, Readers, as you might imagine, I have a few extra bags of Tipo 00 flour on hand. Since you won’t be able to find this product without paying for shipping, I’d love to share my remaining bags with a few of you. Leave a comment if you’re interested. Just tell me you’re favorite thing to eat or you’re most valued kitchen tool (one of mine is commercial-grade plastic wrap, see below) or what’s next on your to-make list. Thanks so much for reading.

fig jam, caramelized onion and blue cheese pizza

fig jam, caramelized onion and blue cheese pizza

2Amys Pizzeria serves D.O.C. Neapolitan pizza, which means they follow the strict requirements outlined by the Italian government for producing authentic Neapolitan pizza. The guidelines cover all the bases: the oven (wood-burning); the shaping (by hand); the final size (no larger than 11 inches); the ingredients (dough must be made with tipo 00 flour, fresh yeast, water and salt and the toppings extend to Italian plum tomatoes, mozzarella di bufala, extra-virgin olive oil, fresh basil and dried oregano).

2Amys Menu

If you’re looking for more information on Tipo 00 flour, this link on Forno Bravo is helpful.
Antimo Caputo tipo 00 flour

dough rising

Jim Lahey dough, ready to be divided

dough, divided

dough balls

I know it is terribly ungreen of me, but one thing I cannot live without is heavy duty plastic wrap. Nothing makes me want to tear my hair out more than a box of super market cling wrap. If you’re OK with having a hideously large shape sitting out in your kitchen for all to see, this product might just change your life.

commercial grade plastic wrap and dough balls

I made this video for my friend, Bates, who was struggling with shaping her dough. I advise watching the one on Serious Eats first. My main goal with this video was to capture the air pockets that pervade the dough when it is handled minimally — the presence of these air pockets make a difference in the final product.

dough with tape measure

pizza, just out of the oven

fig jam, caramelized onions & blue cheese pizza

Fig Jam, Caramelized Onion & Blue Cheese Pizza with Jim Lahey Dough
Pizza Dough Source: Bon Appetit vis Jim Lahey’s book: My Pizza.

Note: If you buy Tipo 00 flour, this recipe comes together in seconds — each bag conveniently weighs 1000g, which is what the recipe calls for.

For this pizza you’ll need:

caramelized onions
fig jam, thinned out with a little bit of water for easy spreading
blue cheese, any type you like
Parmigiano Reggiano, grated
Jim Lahey Pizza Dough (recipe below)

7 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (1000 grams) plus more for shaping dough
4 teaspoons fine sea salt
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast

1. Whisk flour, salt, and yeast in a medium bowl. While stirring with a wooden spoon, gradually add 3 cups water; stir until well incorporated. Mix dough gently with your hands to bring it together and form into a rough ball. Transfer to a large clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let dough rise at room temperature (about 72°) in a draft-free area until surface is covered with tiny bubbles and dough has more than doubled in size, about 18 hours (time will vary depending on the temperature in the room).

2. Transfer dough to a floured work surface. Gently shape into a rough rectangle. Divide into 6 equal portions. Working with 1 portion at a time, gather 4 corners to center to create 4 folds. Turn seam side down and mold gently into a ball. Dust dough with flour; set aside on work surface or a floured baking sheet. Repeat with remaining portions.

3. Let dough rest, covered with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel, until soft and pliable, about 1 hour. DO AHEAD: Can be made 3 days ahead. Wrap each dough ball separately in plastic wrap and chill. Unwrap and let rest at room temperature on a lightly floured work surface, covered with plastic wrap, for about an hour or two before shaping.

4. To Make the Pizzas: During the last hour of dough’s resting, preheat oven to its hottest setting, 500°–550°. Working with 1 dough ball at a time, dust dough with flour and place on a floured work surface. Gently shape dough into a 10″–12″ disk handling it as minimally as possible. Arrange dough disk on parchment-lined baking sheet; top minimally with desired toppings: to make this pizza, first spoon some of the thinned out fig jam over top, then top with caramelized onions, the blue cheese, and finally the Parmigiano Reggiano. Bake pizza until bottom of crust is crisp and top is blistered, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a work surface to slice. Repeat with remaining pizzas.

Shots from our lunch at 2Amys a few weeks ago:
Green tomato, ramp, Grana & egg pizza:
green tomato, ramp, Grana & egg pizza at 2Amys

The margherita pizza at 2Amys is just about the ideal — pizza, food, meal, everything. It is so unbelievably delicious.
margherita pizza at 2Amys

Norcia pizza:
Norcia pizza at 2Amys

121 Comments

  1. Strange coincidence: I just discovered your blog and what are you writing about? Tipo 00 flour, that I just bought yesterday for the first time as well in a – only yesterday discovered – nearby italian supermarket (together with some great buffalo mozzarella and a few other things). It makes a great focaccia as well!

    Reply
  2. I am finishing up a work project and have so many things on my To Cook / Bake list for afterward. One of them is to try the Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes recipes. All your successes with the book have given me hope. I have the book, too, and I can’t wait to try the recipes out!

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  3. I would love to test out that flour! My fiancé is a huge pizza fan so I’ve been dreaming of making him a worthy pie. :) my favorite an most prized kitchen tool is the artisan kitchen aid mixer he bought me for my birthday two years ago. Love it to pieces!!!

    Reply
  4. Those pizzas look good! I’ve only recently become open to the idea of many vegetables on pizza, but I’ve got to admit…can be tasty!

    The next thing I’m planning on making is just an easy (looking?) candy made from apple cider. Should be good=)

    Reply
  5. haah @ the ‘help’ pizza, but as long as it tastes fine, right?! I’ve been wanting to tackle using yeast and making pizza dough for soooo long but the different flour types have been completely overwhelming!

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  6. I read your blog often and have never commented. I love your recipes and many have become our favs-rack of lamb and duck are two that come to mind. I know I will love any recipe you recommend. The blue cheese and carmalized onion pizza is certainly next on my menus. I love neopolitan pizza. Punch pizza in Mpls. is my fav..
    Thanks for the recommendations on the flour.

    Reply
  7. I love to eat fresh berries, couldn’t live without my favorite little spatula, and for lunch this afternoon i’m making some fresh pasta with roasted veggies.
    but i might have to reconsider, because this pizza looks phenomenal!

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  8. Those crusts look amazing! I love trying out new types of flour, I wonder if Tipo 00 would make good flatbreads…which are one of the next things on my to-make list along with focaccia.

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  9. Those crusts look amazing! I wonder if Tipo 00 would make good flatbreads…that’s one of the next things on my to-make list, along with focaccia.

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  10. Checking your blog every week I was also looking for another pizza dough recipe then the one I already have…My 12 year old daughter is having a birthday party tomorrow and we’re making home made pizza (of course!!) and they can put the toppings on themselves. Of course I was very excited about your posting today! I’d love to try your flour, however my fav kitchen tool has nothing to do with pizza but with my love for chinese cooking…my wok, can’t live without it AND my Asian supermarket, yes I know that’s not a kitchentool :-)

    Reply
  11. Great post! My girlfriend travels to DC to visit family and they always go to Two Amy’s at least three times. I’ve yet to go, but I’ve seen plenty of pictures.

    I’ve been making a ton of pizza lately and have been using tipo 00 flour regularly. An Italian Grocery store nearby sells bags of it. It’s fun to work with and I definitely prefer it to all-purpose flower. I’ve been using Jim Lahey’s method to make dough lately which has worked superbly.

    If you want to learn more about pizza dough I would highly recommend reading Jeff Varasano’s pizza recipe http://www.varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm. It’s almost too in depth.

    Reply
    • Dan — thanks so much for sending the awesome link. I just looked at it briefly and it’s already got me thinking. I’m going to read it in depth soon. Those pizzas look just about perfect!

      Reply
  12. What would happen if you used the 00 flour for something like Jim Lahey’s no knead bread?

    I’m currently all about my kitchen scale. It’s invaluable for baking and also really great for just learning about what are appropriate serving sizes if you’re trying to eat healthy.

    Living in NYC right now, I have to say I can’t get enough pizza. Your post has me salivating!

    Reply
    • Rhianna — I adore my kitchen scale too. I would have a hard time cooking without it in fact. I don’t know how the tipo 00 flour would do with boules/loaves/etc — probably awesome? I’ll report back if I give it a go.

      Reply
  13. Thanks for such an in-depth post. I have been wanting to try Tipo 00 for fresh pasta as well. After a year in Afghanistan, the first place my husband wanted to go was 2Amy’s! I have Kim Boyce’s whole wheat chocolate chip cookies on the baking agenda this weekend.

    Reply
  14. Love this amazingly thorough post about pizza and the much raved about tipo 00 flour. I have always wondered what all the “hype” was about, so I appreciate your thoughts on the difference it makes. Also, really appreciate all the great links you shared!

    And I know this has absolutely nothing at all to do with pizza or breads or special four, but next on my “to make” list is a big cookie in a cast iron pan. I saw it somewhere and it has been haunting me ever since!

    Again, thanks so much for sharing all this! I am bookmarking this post for future reference.

    Reply
  15. I just got some new pizza stones from Sur La Table. There are six of them. You can make individual pizzas or put them together and make a big pizza. You can use them on your grill also. I have never made pizza on the grill. I had never heard of that flour but if you have an extra one I would love it. I love your website. Thanks Leslie

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  16. I’d love to try out that flour. My sister makes fantastic pizza crusts, but won’t give out her secret recipe. This just might be the trick up my sleeve that I need. I love, love my immersion blender.

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  17. That pizza looks AMAZING! Next on my to-make list is banana bread, since I have some brown bananas that are ready to be used in baking (definitely too far gone to eat raw!)

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  18. A) you must take me to this pizza place next time I’m in town, B), Bates’ pizza is the best thing I’ve ever seen in my life and C) you seriously must read my mind, I just had awesome pizza yesterday and now am dying for more, so maybe I’ll make some for dbag this weekend! You rock!

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  19. Hi Alexandra- I’m so happy to have found your blog. I love all your attention to detail and to the nuances of what makes food better in taste and texture. I have wanted to make homemade pizza for a long time, but I have been stuck on the fact that I don’t have a pizza stone. I bought and returned one once because I decided it was too large and too heavy to store. Now I am so happy to hear that you have had great success without a pizza stone. I would love to try your recipe with one of your “extra” bags of flour.
    The next thing I plan to make is a dessert with the amazing summer fruit that is at our local farmers’ market right now– peaches, apricots, plums, berries, cherries. So many options, but I think I will make a simple buttermilk cake with fresh peaches.

    Reply
  20. I am going to make spicy chicken kebabs tonight or tomorrow! I would love to try out this flour for some homemade pizza :) We usually do a whole wheat crust when we make it at home so this would be a special treat!!

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  21. My favorite kitchen tool is a wooden spoon. I don’t know why, but I always reach for the wooden spoon for almost every project.

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  22. I love my KitchenAid Artisan mixer that I’ve had for about 15 years. Although I would like to upgrade it to the next level like the Professional so I can get the spiral dough hook. I understand it won’t work on the Artisan. Have been on the lookout for double-0 flour since I read Laura Schenone’s “The Lost Ravioli Recipes of Hoboken”.

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  23. So, even though I realize you are probably out of flour to share, your request gave me the motivation to finally tell you how much I am addicted to your blog. I am an avid kitchen experimenter and have worked at a bakery near Chicago for about four years now. Your pictures are gorgeous and I love your honesty while you talk about recipes and offer tips. Thanks for taking the time to capture your experiences so that we can duplicate them. :)

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  24. 2Amy’s is my favorite pizza place in DC and I can’t wait to try out this dough! My most valued kitchen tool is my mom’s old metric measuring cup from Germany. It’s got markings for flour, sugar, cocoa, and raisins in grams and mL and it’s what allows me to bake all of my favorite German desserts from when I was little. I have yet to find one in America, so it really is precious to me.

    Reply
  25. Thanks for all the super helpful flour info – I’ve only recently been able to master yeast doughs after kilos of wasted doughs/starters, so this is my newest research project!

    I’d love to try out that flour too – My current absolute requirement in my kitchen is my very first, chef quality knife that hubby got me for Christmas. I’ve always made do with our cheap low-grade Henckels, but NOW I SEE the differnece! Plus, I can cook nothing without the standard wood spoon and plastic spatula from William Sonoma.
    :-)

    Reply
  26. My favorite food to eat is ice cream, I blush to say – altho I don’t eat it very often. My favorite tools are my zester, my scale and my hands to make bread/pizza/bagels. Fortuitously I only found your site today but will be returning frequently, to be sure.

    Reply
  27. My favorite kitchen equipment is probably my hand mixer. It comes in handy so often! Especially for one person milkshakes or smoothies. I never have to break out the big blender.

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  28. My favorite thing to eat is fried chicken too bad I can’t make it to save my life and I love cookies lots and lots of cookies lol

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  29. My most valued kitchen tool os my 8″ Wusthof chef knife. I take it with me on vacation! If you have a good Italian market in your area you should be able to find the 00 flour there. Your pizza looks great!

    Reply
  30. I love pizza crust! I have tried many recipes and always strive for that perfect one. I read about Jim Lahey’s pizza in Bon Appetit and did notice the doesn’t matter what flour you use. What a relief, everyone seems to have definite ideas about the flour. I too have wanted to try tipo “oo” flour, just to try it and see if it makes a difference. I have to let you know that my favorite kitchen item is my stainless steel 14″ long pizzeria style rocking pizza cutter. I use it for so many things, cutting carmels, bars, foccacia, scones, etc.. I like it so much I think I will start giving them for presents!

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  31. I’m happy to report that thanks to your detailed instructions our dough is starting to resemble a circle! Will and I are so honored our crust was featured on your blog (also I want to “reassure” everyone that the photo was snapped mid-topping-assembly – the shape was sad, but the toppings were plentiful). Next pizza question: the JL recipe yields 6 portions and says it lasts 2-3 days. How long does it REALLY last if kept in fridge in plastic wrap? I’ve frozen mine in a little olive oil with poor results.

    Fave kitchen utensil is the baking scale.

    Reply
    • Batesers, nothing makes me happier to hear this! I will get back to you on the longevity question. I have a batch in the fridge that I made on Thursday — I’m going to bake one pizza tomorrow and see how the dough behaves. Too bad about freezing. I think Lahey mentioned something about freezing — maybe that it doesn’t work so well? I’ll have to find it. Just glad to hear the dough is resembling a circle!

      Reply
    • Bates — I just made a pizza with 5-day old bread. Definitely past prime. I think 3 days is probably the max the dough should be stored in the fridge. I haven’t tried freezing, yet.

      Reply
  32. Okay so it’s official, I have to rent a car and drive to Italy and buy some 00 flour. It will likely cost way more than $43, but whatever, it will be worth it, it’s pizza after all! Maybe before I do that I’ll scour the Italian markets here….I wonder if there even are any. Hmmm, I must investigate. Anyway I’m rambling, just wanted to say that this looks AMAZING! I still make your other pizza dough weekly, but if this is honestly the best pizza you’ve made at home then I’m going to have to make the switch. YUM. So excited for tomato season so I can make Marcella Hazan’s sauce…and make pizza…maybe on the grill…and eat it outside with a beer. Great post! Love those little chubby baby legs at the pizza table.

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  33. What a coincidence that you are writing about pizza! My husband, daughter and I just returned from a vacation in Maui and the one thing we all craved when we got back was a Neapolitan style Margherita pizza from our favorite Italian restaurant. That is my favorite thing to eat. And it literally was the first thing we had when we got home.

    I have tried many times to recreate an authentic Neapolitan dough. Jim Lahey’s is the closest I have come to. But I was still searching. But thanks to this post maybe my search will end. Can’t wait to try it!

    (I, too, have the ugly box of commercial plastic wrap. Imho, the only thing grocery store wrap clings to is itself).

    Reply
  34. Ali, this looks delicious. I have a backlog of semolina flour, which I use for pizza dough, but once that runs out I’ll try to find Tipo 00 Flour. This post is making me very hungry….

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  35. Hi Alexandra,

    Thanks for the wonderful post. I’m really glad you posted the video because it makes me realize a problem I’ve been having with the Jim Lahey dough (and I guess other pizza dough I’ve made in the past too)– I’m forced to be rougher with it than I’d like because once I stretch the dough in one direction, it immediately bounces back to its original shape. It won’t “stay” stretched out. What am I doing wrong? Do I need more flour? Different flour? Help!

    My favorite kitchen tool is by far a Japanese cutting knife that a very generous friend gave me for Christmas two years ago. It makes chopping anything a pleasure.

    Thanks so much for your help–

    Best,
    Ansley

    Reply
    • Ansley — One thing, and I’m sure you’ve been told this already, but if the dough resists when you initially start stretching it, let it sit for about 20 minutes, and then return to it to start shaping — in this 20 minutes the gluten should relax, which will facilitate better shaping. The Tipo 00 flour really makes a difference in this step. It barely resists the stretching. I do always let the dough rounds sit for about 30 minutes before even beginning to try shaping them.

      Reply
  36. My favorite tool is an xoxo whisk that I use to make pie filling. Couldn’t make it without it! The flour sounds very interesting. I hope I have an opportunity to use it. The fig/blue cheese recipie sounds AMAZING, love LOVE that combination! Cheers!

    Reply
  37. I love my huge wooden cuttibg board. Im still collecting and saving for new tools. I dont know why but i was convinced you lived in CA—not so if you are hitting 2Amys!

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  38. The pizza looks awesome. I have been working with the no-knead recipe for a while, and really like it. My favorite kitchen tool is parchment paper–so many ways to use it :)

    Cheers

    Reply
  39. I never worked with flour type 00 and don´t even know if I can find it, but you´re tempting me! Your pictures are amazing, as usual. The onions are such a great addition to pizza and I made some fig jam the other day, so I guess I´ll go hunting for the flour!

    Reply
  40. Hi Alexandra,

    My favorite tool is my tongs, and I love many things made with oats. I’ve just made my first homemade pizza on Monday 6/4/12 and although the flavors were great(homemade sauce & cheese), my dough came out more like flatbread – I think my yeast was old. :-( Anyway, your pizza looks great, and I’m sure it taste fantastic!

    Reply
  41. When it comes to pizza it all comes down to flour’s quality, water and air!

    Two years ago while I was traveling around Italy we stopped in Genova (a city on Italy’s North-West coast) where focaccia was born/invented. Focaccia is not pizza but somehow very close
    Anyhow, we randomly waled into a bakery near the railway station and bought 3 euros worth of focaccia: the best thing I ever tried in my life. It was so good, I wept!
    The baker told us that it’s impossible to replicate the real focaccia genovese anywhere else in the world because of the flour, water quality, the air, the sea, the olive oil, etc. According to him the perfect focaccia dough happens only in Genova!
    He was probably right because I tried focaccia in other parts of Italy but was not even close to that one.

    Reply
  42. When it comes to pizza it all comes down to flour’s quality, water and air!
    Two years ago while I was traveling around Italy we stopped in Genova (a city on Italy’s North-West coast) where focaccia was born/invented. Focaccia is not pizza but somehow very close
    Anyhow, we randomly waled into a bakery near the railway station and bought 3 euros worth of focaccia: the best thing I ever tried in my life. It was so good, I wept!
    The baker told us that it’s impossible to replicate the real focaccia genovese anywhere else in the world because of the flour, water quality, the air, the sea, the olive oil, etc. According to him the perfect focaccia dough happens only in Genova!
    He was probably right because I tried focaccia in other parts of Italy but was not even close to that one.

    Reply
  43. We love our homemade pizza crust and the pizza made with goat cheese, garlic, olive oil, slivered red onion, crushed fennel seed and hot red pepper flakes topped with arugula tossed in olive oil & garlic and then prosciutto strips and peels of fine Parmesan on top. Oh my goodness it’s good.

    We couldn’t do without the pizza cutter!

    Love your website. Would just love to be able to try the flour.

    Reply
  44. Hi Alexandra,
    Can you please suggest where should I place my rack in the oven. Lowest or highest? I have a pizza stone.
    Thanks.

    Reply
    • Sana — I would place the rack in the lowest part of the oven. Do you like your pizza stone? I’m thinking about getting one. I had one once, but I got rid of it during a move. I found it always just sat in my oven uncleaned for weeks at a time, because I would forget about it once I turned the oven off.

      Reply
  45. There are a couple kitchen tools that my life would be empty without. My bench scraper. It saves me when I make dough or batter that ends up on the counter top. Silicone spatulas. Because we all know how fast those rubber and plastic ones deteriorate. My 80s-era Kitchen-Aid mixer. Because it could survive a nuclear blast and just. Keep. Mixing.

    My favorite thing to eat? Easy–FOOD.

    Your pizza recipe makes me weak in the knees. I MUST try this flour. I am a believer in certain flours being better than others. My sister-in-law introduced me to Lehi Mills Strong Baking Flour and for rolls, buns, and rich dough goods (challah, brioche), there’s nothing better. It is so tender and light, but not as flimsy as all-purpose and not as robust as bread flour. Right in between. Delight.

    Reply
    • Whitney, I just ordered 10 more bags… I’ll send you one once they arrive. I honestly wish I could send a bag of this flour to everyone I know. I think it really makes a difference.

      Also, you are hilarious. Agree 100% re bench scraper and silicone spatulas! Thanks for the tip on the Lehi Mills Strong Baking Flour. I’m going to have to try that next.

      Reply
  46. ooh, they used 00 flour when I took a pasta class in italy! it’s definitely tough to find here though :) and now i’m lusting over that plastic wrap, lol.

    the next thing on my to-make list is a cold soup, a riff off of the watermelon-feta salad that is a summer favorite… we’ll see if it works!

    Reply
  47. Hi, I’m a brand new reader and I’m already in love with your photos and recipes! I also live in the DC area and I’m wondering if The Italian Store in Falls Church might carry this flour? It’s worth it to check, I suppose, especially for folks who won’t go through a case that quickly! Thanks for the information and inspiration!

    Reply
    • Meaghan — Hi! Thanks so much for sharing the link to the Italian Store. In my area (south of Quantico) there is a dearth of shops such as these. I am going to make a stop by this store next time I’m up that way. I will let you know if I discover anything. Thanks again for writing in!

      Reply
  48. I was so eager to try this and I found 00 flour in a local market. I’ve had a lot of experience with Lahey’s no-knead bread recipe and other pizza doughs; I was disappointed in this one because it was FAR too watery/liquid to knead into shape after a day or two. Was it because of the heat here? Did I let it rest too long? I ended up adding a lot of AP flour and even some whole wheat–the finished result was okay but a little more “bready” than I like. What did I do wrong?

    Reply
    • Ellen, it sounds as though you added too much flour to make it more manageable to handle? I understand why you added the flour, but if it ended up tasting “bready,” then too much flour is likely the culprit. I don’t know how to advise — since you have experience with the Lahey dough, you obviously know what the texture looks like before you let it start it’s long slow rise. It’s always on the wetter side initially, but after that long rise, it becomes more manageable, though you don’t want to handle it too much anyway. I had remembered reading something about how the dough made with Tipo 00 flour handles differently than the dough made with all-purpose flour, but when I revisited that site, it actually said the opposite — that it hydrates well and that you might find yourself adding more water to create the right texture. (Here is the link: http://www.fornobravo.com/PDF/Using-caputo-tipo00.pdf). I have found that the Lahey dough after day 3 does get a little wetter, but not after day one or two. I am stumped and I wish I had more answers for you.

      Reply
  49. Just found your website via a link from Juniper Moon and am having a great time browsing – love the Julia Child cards! I’m in my 60’s, was raised on canned and frozen products. She taught me to be bold, exuberant and most of all curious. I still miss her.

    Unfortunately my favorite cooking tool is no longer made – it looks like a mini tennis racquet and is made out of stainless steel and mixes dough and batter like a dream. The company that made it – Wirax – is in England but all efforts to find another have been in vain.

    My first one came from a store in Old Town Alexandria on Cameron St. – La Cuisine. By the way they sell the Tipo 00 Flour – I just bought some a couple of weeks ago. And they are in the middle of their annual 20% off sale, I think it ends on Aug. 31. If you don’t know this store it’s a great find. Nancy, the owner started it 40 years ago and for a small shop it’s a treasure trove of great finds and everybody who works there cooks.

    I guess my current favorite tools are the microplane zesters and my old standby – chopsticks. I use them for everything.

    Great site – Thanks – Deborah

    Reply
  50. Glad I landed on your site! I’m a huge fan of Two Amys. I’m also a big fan of the no knead method, so I was wondering if using 00 flour required more or less water than the recipe calls for?

    By the way, last week I tried the Jamie Oliver pizza crust (from the FoodNetwork website) with 00 flour and it was great. It wasn’t no knead, but still easy by using my KitchenAid with a bread hook.

    Reply
    • Joy, I am no expert, but apparently Tipo 00 flour hydrates very well, so if anything you would need less water. I have not altered the recipe proportions when I have used the tipo 00 flour, and the result is great, but again, if you were to do anything differently, I would say use less water. Hope that helps!

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  51. Yum this is my new favorite pizza..found it on Pinterest and then it clicked ! Wish you still lived here to teach an old dog new tricks!

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  52. In what order did you place the ingredients? I would think jam, cheese, onions, but I could be wrong. And about how much of each did you use? Thanks so much for this yummy yummy idea.

    Reply
    • Natalie — I did jam (thinned with a little water) first then onions and then cheese, but I think the order you listed would work just fine. I tend to do cheese last because I think it might protect the other ingredients from drying out or burning, but in this case, I don’t think it really matters. As for quantities, I just eyed it all. But, I definitely subscribe to the idea that less is more when it comes to pizza toppings. Don’t load it up. Spread the jam in a very thin layer. Top with another thin layer of onions — try to visualize slices and think about how much you would want per bite. And then top it all with a thin layer of cheese, scattering the blue cheese evenly in various spots and the parmesan all over. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  53. Are you still sharing your flour?I love making artisan breads and sell it to a local cheese shop and haven’t been able to find this flour in my neck of the woods.Is it good for making bread as well as pizza?BTW, my FAVORITE tool is my bench scraper.Thanks so much! Judy

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  54. What a beauty! A pizza pie with simple yet flavorful toppings really is the best. Would love to play around and try TIPO 00. I can’t live without my chef’s knife. Cheers!

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  55. Remarkable issues here. I am very satisfied to look your article. Thanks so much and I am having a look ahead to touch you. Will you please drop me a e-mail?

    Reply
  56. Great post. I live near 2 Amy’s, and just found the tipo 00 flour for sale at Vace’s Italian Deli in Cleveland Park. Next time you make the one-hour drive to 2 Amy’s you should swing down Vace’s (only about a mile away) and you can save the shipping cost.

    Reply
    • Robert, thank you for the tip on Vace’s. When the weather warms up a little bit (not that it has been cold) we will get back into our morning zoo-2Amy’s lunch routine again, and I will definitely check out Vace’s. I imagine there are some other goodies there as well. There is a serious dearth of such markets where I live. Thanks again!

      Reply
  57. Hi Alexandra! Quick question: any final results on how freezing this dough turned out? I just made a batch, but think 6 pizzas might be a little much for one person in one week! I’ll refrigerate them for now, and just invite friends over to help with the eating. But if you have any insights on whether freezing this dough for a while works out, I would love to hear about it. (sorry if you already answered this question previously, I couldn’t find it in the prior comments). Cheers- Kamilla

    Reply
    • Kamilla — hi! I don’t think that I did answer this question in the comments yet. Unfortunately, I have found that the dough really doesn’t freeze very well. I have had the best luck freezing it immediately after portioning it into the six pieces, but even when I freeze it right away, it just doesn’t perform as well as when it is freshly made. I almost think it might be best to loosely shape the rounds into smallish disks — just flatten and stretch out lightly — and to bake them off in this pita-bread or flatbread shape and to then place these baked disks off in the freezer to be used at a later date. The frozen pita-shaped disks wouldn’t be used as pizza, but you could reheat them and just use them as a sort of dinner bread — maybe you could brush them with olive oil and sprinkle them with cheese and herbs while they are reheating to give them a little more flavor. Does this make sense? I hope so. My other thought — sorry to be thinking out lout here — is to maybe freeze one of your rounds just so you can see how it fares for yourself. You might have better luck than I. I will report back if I make any more discoveries along these lines. My inlaws are coming to town this week, and I promised them a pizza night. I will experiment with the leftover dough and report back.

      Reply
  58. Just read this post top to bottom. Any suggestions on a GREAT gluten free pizza pie recipe? Thank you for your wonderful videos and pictures.

    Reply
    • Dianne — I’m afraid I don’t at the moment. I have been experimenting with gluten free flours for my peasant bread recipe, and I haven’t found a combination that really works to my liking. I’m sorry :( I will definitely report back if I make any discoveries.

      Reply
  59. Just finished our woodburning pizza oven after several months of work (only able to work on weekends). It is my new favorite tool though its not in the kitchen. Can’t wait to try the Jim leahy pizza dough.

    Reply
    • Wow, very exciting! I have to admit, I still have a dream of building such an oven, but the steel is a nice substitute in the meantime. What was your process for building one? Lahey pizza dough is my favorite.

      Reply
    • No such thing as dumb question! You are correct: absolutely no kneading in the dough. Awesome to know that they sell tipo 00 flour at Whole Foods. I am out at the moment and was about to place my usual 10-bag order on Amazon, but your comment is making me think I should get to a Whole Foods — I just moved and don’t have my freezer set up to store all of that flour yet. Anyway, I think the flour you bought is going to work beautifully. I made a batch of the Lahey dough last night using bread flour, and while the finished pizzas were delicious, I did notice a difference in the taste and texture — the tipo 00 flour has really spoiled me. I just googled “protein content in Antimo Caputo flour” (which is the flour I have been ordering), and I haven’t been able to find anything as precise as grams per cup, but I re-read this article, which I always find helpful: http://www.fornobravo.com/pizza-ingredients/caputo.html I always forget that the “00” refers to how finely ground the flour is versus the protein content. Are you going to make the Lahey dough? The biggest tip I give to people with this recipe is to try to handle the dough as minimally as possible — all of those lovely air pockets in the dough create such a nice texture. And finally, have you discovered the Baking Steel yet? It’s my new favorite gadget: http://www.alexandracooks.com/2013/08/01/baking-steel-pizza-tomato-mozzarella-caramelized-onion-burrata/

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  60. Thanks for the reply. YES I am gonna make the Lahey dough (without a rehearsal…going by your photogtaphs) for my Saturday night Pizza Party!!!! And I love the idea of a “desert pizza” with carmelized onions and fig jam. I am going to improvize of that idea and am going to go with carmelized onions (with a pinch of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaggery to sweeten the onions further) and bitter orange marmalade. THinking what would be a good cheese that would go with it. I guess Parmigiano Reggiano (grated into the pizza post the baking) wont hurt but do u have any other suggestions? Also, the wholefoods “Anna” typo 00 wasnt expensive either… 2.99$ for 2.2 pounds (nice round number????…basically 1KG implying it is imported from Europe…Italy in this case). Also, FYI, i cut up one baby bella mushroom, stirfried it in a spot of EVOO, salt and peper and a tiny amt of basil pesto. I made a 2mm thin ravioli sheet (just one) out of the typo 00 flour, put the mushroom in it, ground some Parmigiano Reggiano and boiled it for 2 minutes. THE BEST RAVIOLI I HAVE EVER HAD. took me all of 3 min! Couldnt wait for ur reply to try out the typo 00 flour.

    Reply
    • No rehearsal?! You are brave! Ok, you’ll have to let me know if you have any questions, though it sounds as though you’ve got things under control in the kitchen…I am so impressed by your ravioli story! I cannot believe you made ONE ravioli. I love it. And I must try it. I cannot believe I have never tried the tipo 00 flour in pasta yet. I haven’t been using my brain apparently. Love the sound of your mushroom filling, too.

      OK, as for cheese suggestions, I always love burrata or buffalo mozzarella or fresh ricotta — you could go all out and even make the ricotta? (So easy: http://www.alexandracooks.com/2011/08/11/pizza-margherita-homemade-tomato-sauce-homemade-ricotta/) If you like blue cheese — gorgonzola dulce or even something simple like a Maytag blue — it’s always a nice complement to the caramelized onion and fig jam . Hmm, what else? If I think of any other cheeses, I will report back!

      Good luck! Let me know how it turns out!

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  61. You call me brave! I call myself foolhardy… anyway it did not turn out the way yours did for sure… I am pretty sure I know where I screwed up. … it was step 1.

    1. Whisk flour, salt, and yeast in a medium bowl. While stirring with a wooden spoon, gradually add 3 cups water; stir until well incorporated. Mix dough gently with your hands to bring it together and form into a rough ball.

    “Well incorporated” =??? and
    “Mix dough gently with your hands to bring it together and form into a rough ball. ”

    I translated these statements as best as I could into practice but i had to add more water else the ball wouldnt come together…

    THe pizza didnt rise as much in the end….
    I looked at Leahy’s directions but I couldnt find pictures for that crucial first step anywhere on the web..

    THe toppings turned out to be real nice :-)

    Reply
    • Oh I am so sorry to hear this :( That is never fun.

      I don’t know how to analyze exactly, but I have never had to add more or less water — I always add the three cups of water to the 1000g flour. Did you measure the flour by weight?

      Interestingly, I made a batch of the Lahey dough (a half batch actually) using a new brand of tipo 00 flour, and I found that the dough was much stiffer than when I use the Antimo Caputo. The texture of the new brand was almost as fine as whey protein powder, and I think that I probably could have used a little more water. The dough did rise during the 18 hours but not as much as when I use the Antimo Caputo flour. The dough still ended up making good pizza, but I don’t think it was as tasty as when I use the AC.

      Also, you might be able to see how the dough looks in the first step if you can get the video on this Serious Eats post to open: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/03/jim-laheys-no-knead-pizza-dough-recipe.html I can’t on my ipad at the moment.

      So sorry the pizzas didn’t go as planned. Glad to hear the toppings turned out nice:)

      Reply
  62. What is your water to flour ratio for this recipe? I use type 00 flour as well with 70% hydration and my dough is super sticky… There’s no way I could pat it down and touch it like you did in your video without it sticking to my paws… :/

    Reply
    • Hey! ok, I just weighed 3.5 cups of water, and it came out to be 810 grams. And since the flour weighs 1000g, it looks as though it’s about an 80% hydration — is that right? I’m not sure I’m calculating the hydration properly. In any case, the dough is always super sticky when you mix it, and it is super sticky even after the 18-hour rise, but when you go to shape it, as long as you use enough flour on your hands and work surface, it really isn’t too hard to work with. And it is SO good. I am obsessed with this recipe.

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  63. I buy the red bag of Antimo Caputo flour locally and just want to warn anyone trusting an exact 1000 grams of flour. I weigh each bag as is when I get home and they always come in 960 – 970 grams. I weigh out 500 grams per batch. If you are going to weigh out all the other ingredients then you want the flour to be exact as well.

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  64. Welcome to the Capital District of NY! I’ve been enjoying your site and just had to tell you I made the pizza dough and it was fantastic! I too bought 10 bags of the 00 flour, 9 of which are in my freezer. Just had to tell you that I had every intention of making focaccia with the leftovers but never got around to it. So, I froze the remaining four dough pieces (wrapped them in plastic as you suggested and put the wrapped pieces in a large zip top bag). Well, we made pizza with the frozen dough this week-end and it was fantastic. Thanks so much for the inspiration.

    Reply
    • Karen, hi! And thank you for the warm welcome. I am so sorry for the delay here — I’ve been in WI for a week, returning tomorrow night. So happy to hear the pizza dough worked out for you! My freezer is stashed with the flour, too. I think it truly makes a difference in the taste and textuer of the dough. I have two rounds of the dough frozen, too, actually — first time — and I am relieved to hear that it works well after freezing. It will be pizza dinner Thursday night!

      Reply
  65. 守屋直幸らのリーダーと友人を救い出すのに間に合うように、考古学者のは戻ります。
    に、守屋直幸はすべて備えていました、我々がそうしたものであるように、我々のほとんどはちょうどもう少し見たいです。
    はこの関連を最大にします各々のイメージにおいて、振付けは音楽と同期します。
    男性のダンスはすべての古典的なメタルヘッドの動きのコレクションです。
    ジミー・チョウオウとそれから守屋直幸は、顔で女性の小さいものを捜しました。
    神は、主の能力と資源で本当に無制限です。
    最後のモジュールはあなたの元ガールフレンドまたはボーイフレンドとのコミュニケーションを事実上再開することのために設計される組織的行動計画を含んでいるレッスンから台のビデオの成ります。
    ジョー・守屋直幸(ポップ・守屋直幸の故帝王の父)がベトナムで億米ドルのホテルと遊園地に投資したと、はわかってきました。
    守屋直幸が才であった、そして、守屋直幸が才でナイトクラブで歌い始めた守屋直幸の舞台の才能を、主の親は発見しました。
    は、ドラムとマイク・パーツ(新しくリリースされたロックと競争するために適切な)(ユーザーが守屋直幸ら自身の楽譜を作成する能力だけでなく)の追加を提供する最初のでした。
    「よく実行された美容整形が先進の老いた顔から何年もかかることができるが、回復がするボリュームのような人の事前の自然な、より若々しい出演を、何も元に戻さないか、保持しません」、は言いました。
    特に関係の故障で最も一般的な原因のつがコミュニケーションの不足であると人が理解するとき、技術は好ましい関係を築くために重要です。
    守屋直幸・ジョーダンは年にノースカロライナにバスケットボール学問を受け入れました、守屋直幸は文化地理学を専攻しました。
    は絶えずあなたの人格を魅力があって魅力的に作る衣類でなくあなたを素晴らしく見えさせる腕時計のようなアクセサリーです。
    また、通常弱い料金と第の結果とともに、率の増加は保管各種取り合わせによって輸入と購入品に加えて出力をしばしば本当に励まします。
    「液体。
    守屋直幸の肉親が感情(守屋直幸らは後でしました)に明らかに見せなかった死の後右翼。
    オンラインを経た買っているものの傾向が保存するは、人気に追いついています、あなたがオンラインを価値がある経験を購入させると考えるべきである多くのものが、あります。
    は、過去年です、は古ぼけた表面へのこの合同の道を仕上げました。
    そして、他の専門家を訓練して、主要な複雑化または一回の改訂なしであらゆる年齢の何百人もの患者を治療する。
    シムズ家族、はバレーの行なえる家族です。
    コース(システム)のタイトル起こるプログラムの賢く設計された中心的な根底にある信念から由来しますそうであります―、と前に―。
    衣類は、守屋直幸らが提供する快適さのために、誰にでも好かれます。
    はその優れた良質な信憑性に本当になったハイエンドの商標名です。
    どこかで、会社は傷跡を癒やす新製品を持っています。
    チェックポイントは個々の状況に基づいて審査されなければなりません。

    Reply
  66. は、我々の感覚があるが、我々の感情を我々を持たせないことになっています。
    そこのは更なる探求、持久力のつとティモールの山での地質学的発見です。
    血リットル当たりのミリグラムのメタンフェタミン()。
    は、現在の状況休暇デビー・ローに役立ちます。
    あなたが新しい関係に前を直視する、あなたはより好ましいインタラクションを考慮に入れるために古くて不完全な通信パターンを壊すことができる必要があります。
    神のタイムテーブルに関しては、落ち着かなくならなくしましょう。
    私が自分の道をものにしている砦か多分トライに守屋直幸らを主の方法にしてもらいたいだろうかどうか、は私に尋ねました。
    あなたが守屋直幸の最後まで抵抗するファンであるならば、はオンライン・ストアからあなたの選んだ方の守屋直幸Tシャツを得ようと急ぎます。
    さらにまた、非常な興奮を増すために、家族は祝うためにカボチャ、キャンディ、グリーティングカード、党、レストランとより多くを持ちます。
    、-バスモードで歌「解体」を終えてください。
    ベスは、長年にわたってピエール・サリンジャー、前ケネディ・ホワイトハウス報道官、、の時代のために実際に働きました。
    守屋直幸はあなたへのこれらの負付着の全てを切るために光のこの「語」を使用します。
    ロバート・ビーマンの現在の小説(のための)は、原爆で今度は、への次のテロ攻撃の行動物語です。
    それが完全な絵である必要がないことに注意すべきです、しかし、あなたは主題を焦点が合っているようにしなければならなくて、正しい角度からそれを得なければなりません。
    金メダルを獲得していて、世界に通用する水泳競争で世界記録を作っている十代の奇才についての話は、軍団です。
    鳴るかもしれないは政治的に不適切な語に合います。
    、トゥルーで十分で、あらゆるショーはそれ自身の運命のいたずらを持ちますあなたは、タレントショーの結果より予測できない何にも期待することができません。
    は、いろいろなレベルならびに財布の中にほとんどデザインものを置かないことができます。
    そして、盲目に見る際に保存される。
    階テーブルとしての、床に穏やかに座るように見える下って大きい足引きとこの要素は二階をサポートします。
    守屋直幸はステージでいるのが好きでした。
    そして、守屋直幸のファンがこれまでに生きた最も優秀な人々の人から感情で息を吐き出すということを知っていました。
    宝石はベゼルと異なる装飾のセンターで異なる行儀でセットされます。
    スティーブン・スピルバーグの「シンドラーの」は、その期間のその薄暗い描写のために、作品部門のためにオスカーを与えられました。
    そして、厳しい白黒の写真撮影において提出される。
    製作によってオンライン資源の使用を得たいと思う人々の良い数は前のステップを行うことができません、そして、これは守屋直幸らの無能に起因していません。
    主人公守屋直幸はゲームで見つかるつの主な任務ハブを通して女性の人のさまざまな人と関係をもつ選択権を持ちます。
    インタビュアーどうですかように、そこ―つまり、あなたがその力を取り扱う必要がある技術セットであること―に、続くことはあります。

    Reply

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