Ramp Green Pesto & Pizza | Pickled Ramps

ramp green pesto and burrata pizza
About this time last year, I discovered the beauty of baking pizzas naked and dressing them out of the oven with simple, light herb-and-cheese sauces. The benefits of this method are twofold: 1.) Liberated of toppings, the dough springs in the oven, emerging with dramatic crests and craters that so nicely cradle sauce and cheese. 2.) Ingredients, herbs especially, sprinkled on post baking retain their fresh, bright flavors.

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Fair Trade Giveaway | Coconut Oil Granola

coconut oil granola

There are some recipes I feel I could spend the rest of my life tweaking. I have been making this granola (referred to as toasted muesli in the past) for almost two years now, and just this past week, I made my favorite version to date.

Before making this latest change, I had made two others that I felt considerably improved the flavor and cooking process: [Continue reading]

Ginger Fried Rice with Poached Egg

ginger-fried rice with poached egg

A surefire way to create a viral stir, in the food blogosphere at least, is to post a three-ingredient-or-less recipe: One-ingredient ice cream! Two-ingredient pancakes! Three-ingredient pasta sauce! What’s not to love?

I am the first to click on these links and never cease to be amazed by their outcome. They often take little time to make and rarely require odd ingredients. Last fall, I discovered one of my favorite such recipes: the Canal House’s chicken with preserved lemon, a dish that, in my mind, exemplifies the notion of simple meeting spectacular.

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Some News: A Book

peasant bread

A little over a year ago, I received a comment on the peasant bread post that read:

I found your recipe quite some time ago. In the post, you had a link to a source for the Pyrex bowls. I just happened to find it on a day when the bowls were on sale for $1.99 each. I bought 48 of them! I baked bread and gave two bowls to each family at Christmas along with a copy of your recipe…

Nothing, of course, made me happier than to read that. When I shared my mother’s simple recipe in the PB post, I hoped people would discover how easy bread baking can be. But what I hoped for more than anything was that people would love the bread so much that they, too, would want to share it with others — neighbors, friends, or 24 family members.

Over the years, many people have written in noting their favorite adaptations of the peasant bread from simply adding herbs and cheese to making cinnamon-and-sugar monkey bread to doubling the recipe, baking it in three loaf pans, and making sandwich bread for the week.

Many people have had success with the recipe, but every day people write in with questions: Can the bread be mixed at night and baked in the morning? Can the dough travel, say, to a party, and be baked on the premises? Can the bread be doubled and halved, baked in other vessels? Can the dough be frozen?

Friends, I’m so excited to share some news. [Continue reading]

Greek Easter in VT

lamb on spit

Last Friday, I packed the kids into our spaceship and zoomed north to celebrate Greek Easter with my aunt and uncle, who had been preparing for the occasion for days: dying eggs for the tsougrisma, rinsing and soaking intestines for the kokoretsi, preparing the spit for the lamb we would be roasting over the weekend.

Vermont, as always, was a dream. Here’s a little recap of the occasion:
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Pickled Egg Salad Toasts

pickled egg salad toasts with prosciutto

About this time of year every year, I wonder why I don’t make egg salad more often — it’s so good, it’s light (or can be at least), and it’s filled with protein to boot. Earlier this week, I made a recipe from Shed via Bon Appetit, and I am now wondering why for all these years I haven’t been pickling my hard-boiled eggs before turning them into salad. Yes, the pickling is more work, but the bite and flavor this extra step brings is well worth the effort, which, by the way, takes all of five minutes.

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Orecchiette with Swiss Chard, Brown Butter & Walnuts

orecchiette pasta in bowl

I’m sharing a recipe for orecchiette with Swiss chard, brown butter and walnuts over on Cup of Jo today. This is a variation of a favorite recipe I make all winter with Brussels sprouts, brown butter and walnuts, which I love, but which is a little fussy — peeling all of those sprouts takes time.

Here, the pasta is simply drained over the chard or kale — just enough to wilt it — and when you use baby Swiss chard or kale, which I found at my Green Market last Sunday, it is especially good. Recipe over on Cup of Jo!

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Chez Panisse’s Famous Calzones

cut calzone

Before last week, I never would have described a calzone as light. Or as something that tastes like spring. Or as something I would consider serving to company, maybe sliced into rounds to reveal its oozing, cheesy goodness.

Well, leave it to Chez Panisse to create that very calzone, a six-inch round of pizza dough filled with a mix of goat cheese and mozzarella, minced scallions, parsley and garlic, and slivers of prosciutto.

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